1. January 1951, a husband comes in the door carrying Coronet magazine: “Hi, honey, I’m home! Here, I found this article on beauty through housework. So when you clean the house, you can do it on tiptoes to tone your legs or whatever. Well, I had a tough day working, so I’ll be in the den making myself a highball. I dropped my coat by the front door. Imitate a windmill when you pick it up.”

     
  2. Finally finished painting the new dining room built-ins to hold the ever-growing library. Still need to put in the lower shelves and install the doors on the lower cabinets. The color of the backings matches the paint on the upper parts of the room’s other walls (a charcoal gray with a slight brown undertone). Most of these will hold LPs, not books, so book storage remains a concern as always!

     
  3. "Death on Horseback" illustration from the humanist poem Der Ackermann aus Böhmen (The Plowman of Bohemia), written by Johannes von Tepl ca. 1401 and printed ca. 1463. Here we see not only Death as a hunter on horseback but the now-familiar image of Death as a reaper. Reprinted in Four in Hand by Sylvia Townsend Warner.

     
  4. Just announced for October. I’m just so happy. They could not have chosen a better illustrator for the artwork than David Merveille.

     
  5. CD tray insert by Chris Ware for the Basta Music release James Scott, The Complete Works: 1903–1922. Scott was one of the most important ragtime composers, whose career began in Missouri around the time of the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, thus Ware’s lovely illustrations of the fair grounds here, in daylight and under a starry sky.

     
  6. Fraternity hazing gone horribly wrong, by Steve Ditko, from Strange Suspense (orig. The Thing #13, 1954).

     
  7. Four rare Hergé drawings from The Black Island. After 1936, when the comics were still black and white, Tintin’s publishers started to inset four color plates into the books. (From Tintin and the World of Hergé by Benoît Peeters)

     

  8. Henry Miller’s 10 Greatest Writers of All Time

    1. Lao-Tzu

    2. François Rabelais

    3. Friedrich Nietzsche

    4. Rabindranath Tagore

    5. Walt Whitman

    6. Marcel Proust

    7. Élie Faure

    8. Marie Corelli

    9. Fyodor Dostoyevsky

    10. Isaac Bashevis Singer

    (from The Book of Lists)

     
  9. One of the things I find funny about pulp covers like this is how they’re so unabashedly exploitative yet often can’t resist trying for a veneer of respectability by making a bid for concern over “social problems” related to sexuality: “Can society continue to turn its back on these people beyond the pale? … Can it ever be condoned?” Also the way they reused the painting of the redhead on the front cover for the back but changed the hair so that the hand would be blacked out. (Beacon-Signal Books, 1962.)

    This was a “found” item. I’ve only flipped through it, but it’s extremely tame. Lots of dull dialogue.

     
  10. Wounded Narcissist, R. Crumb, from Waiting for Food.

     
  11. R. Crumb, from Waiting for Food. Drawn in Sauve, France, in the early 1990s.

     
  12. Clarence “Pinetop” Smith was a blues pianist who died at 24 from a gunshot wound in a dance hall in 1929. From R. Crumb’s placemat drawings book Waiting for Food.

     
  13. X-ray tube for therapy on display at an x-ray exhibition in London, 1928. From The Hulton Getty Picture Collection: 1920s.

     
  14. A legendary flyer by the mysterious Francis E. Dec, Esquire, about whom almost nothing is known. In the 1980s he bulk-mailed his all-but-unreadable flyers to many people who did not request them, and they usually contained cryptic and repetitious writings about a conspiracy by a “Computer God” to control brainwashed “Frankenstein slaves” using radio devices.

    Sample sentence from this flyer: “THESE HANGMAN ROPE SNEAK DEADLY GANGSTERS, THE JUDGES AND POLICE, trick-trap, rob, wreck, butcher and murder the people to keep them TERRORIZED IN GANGSTER FRANKENSTEIN EARPHONE RADIO SLAVERY for the COMMUNIST GANGSTER GOVERNMENT AND CON ARTIST PARROTING PUPPET GANGSTER PLAY BOY SCUM ON TOP, THE SECRET WORK of ALL POLICE in ORDER to MAINTAIN A COMMUNIST CLOSED SOCIETY.”

     
  15. Amateur painters can build their skills by following this example and choosing a simple, familiar subject such as… a pack of wolves devouring a steer carcass. Acrylic on canvas by Vic Martin. (One of my series of images from Thrift Store Paintings)